Tag Archives for " Switching "

Isolating Defenders 2 v 1

By Sean Pearson

Area Size: Half Field

Teams: 20 mins

Players: 5 v 5 + 2

Objectives

  • For players understand where to use the 2v1 overloads
  • To use the movements of defenders against them and have multiple options to attack

Set-Up

Use half a 9v9 field with 5 defenders set up as GK-3-1 and 5 attackers in a 4-1 or a 1-3-1. Have 3 gates of which the 2 wide gates are occupied by a neutral. If you have an extra player use as a neutral in the middle gate.

Execution

Use the middle of the field with the natural 2v1 overload. Draw the lone defensive midfielder towards the ball by moving forward. When then defensive midfielder comes across, use an angled pass forwards to the other midfielder. Encourage this midfielder to take the space and drive forwards.

When the midfielder gets close to the penalty area the central defender has to make a decision. The striker moves away from the ball and (1) if the defender comes across to stop the forward momentum of the midfielder, this opens up the pass for the striker.

(2) if the defender is drawn to the striker or does not close down the midfielder well enough then the midfielder can either continue to drive forwards or dribble past the defender.

When the central midfielders pass out wide the neutral then becomes involved in the play. To set up the scenario, the wide midfielder must be as wide as possible with space in front of them. If the full back steps up to mark the wide midfielder, then a pass behind them is the option. As the ball is travelling towards the wide midfielder the neutral begins their overlapping run. The wide midfielder then drives inward whilst the striker runs behind the central defender and the opposite wide midfielder runs behind the opposite fullback.

Use the movement of the full back and central defender to determine what pass is best. As the wide midfielder is driving inside, this should bring the full back in with them, which allows more space for the overlapping full back for the 2v1 overload. 1) slide the full back in and they can cross early to the players attacking the goal. 2) If the full back aims to stop that pass by not coming in field with the driving wide midfielder, slide the striker in behind the defense with a split pass between the central defender and full back. Now you are manipulating the movement of the full back with the 2v1.

If the defense wins possession they look to dribble through an empty gate or pass to a neutral behind a gate to score.

Variations

  • Use other formations to create 2v1 overloads at different areas of the field.
  • Add another defender is possible to make it more challenging for the offense.
  • If you end up with 6v5, if the defense scores have them switch with the offense

By Sean Pearson. Sean is also the author Coaching Team Shape in the 3-3-1, Coaching Team Shape in the 4-2-3-1 and Coaching Team Shape in the 4-3-3

Losing Your Marking

By Sean Pearson

Area Size: Half Field

Teams: 20 mins

Players: 8 v 8

Objectives

  • To make the center of the field big to spread the player out.
  • To manipulate the man marking players away from the ball.

Set-Up

Two teams, the team you are working with is to be set up in a 2-1-2-2 (to replicate a 3 in midfield) against a 3-2-1-1.

 

Execution

Occasionally you will come up a team in youth soccer that their defensive organization is to man mark your central midfielders. This is because it is the easiest form of defending that necessarily doesn’t involve any coaching. The coach just tells the player to follow their counterpart. Is it effective? Yes. Is there a time and place to go man to man? Yes. Should you do it all the time? In my opinion, no.

The good thing about man to man when defending is your players are close, however if the opposition players spread out and move in a way to combat the man marking it becomes a problem for the defending team. This is what I will talk about in this article, how to manipulate the players who man mark.

It is important that when playing out from the back that your 3 midfielders start in high positions. This will allow the CB’s more time and allow more space to move into. With a 3 v 1 at the back, which is usually what happens with today’s preference of the 4-3-3 or 4-2-3-1 formations, your defenders can move the ball away from the single striker.

When the CB looks up, the defensive midfielder (#6) drops into the space, the attacking midfielder on the CB side with the ball rotates with the wide player, who stars high and comes down and in. Because the defending midfielders are man marking they follow these players and space is created.

As the wide player receives the ball they can either (1) turn and drive with the ball if there is no pressure behind them or (2) the can set the ball back to the #6, who has run behind the player marking them as they look at the ball.

If/when the midfielder doesn’t go with the defensive midfielder as they drop the CB now plays the ball to them. The attacking midfielder on the ball’s side drops down and the attacking midfielder on the opposite side moves up the field. This creates space for the wide player to drop in to and the CB to move up in to. The #6 can then choose which option is best to play depending on the movements of the defending team.

 

Variations

  • Use different formations
  • Have the team’s flip when the ball goes out for a goal kick

By Sean Pearson. Sean is also the author Coaching Team Shape in the 3-3-1, Coaching Team Shape in the 4-2-3-1 and Coaching Team Shape in the 4-3-3

5 v 5 + 5 Possession

By Sean Pearson

Area Size: 45 x 25 (2 x (20 x 25)) + 5 x 25

Teams: 20 mins

Players: 5 v 5 + 5

Objectives

  • To move the ball quickly with fast paced passes
  • Decide whether to play through or over due to pressure

Set-Up

Three areas, 2 x 20 x 25 possession areas for a 4 v 3 and a 5 x 25 Area for 2 defenders. Four neutrals on the ends and 1 neutral who is allowed in both possession areas.

Execution

The aim is to move the ball from one end of the field to the other using the neutral players. The team in possession, as well as the neutral players, decide what is the best way to keep possession and move the ball by looking at the defensive positioning.

The neutral that is allowed in the possession areas helps the team in possession to be in a 4 v 3 overload. The team look to play across to the other side, where 2 of their teammates are waiting to receive the ball. When deciding when and how to play across, players look at the positioning of the two players in the middle zone and pass either between or around them.

When the ball moves across to the opposite possession area, 3 defensive players (including the 2 players in the middle zone) move across. 3 players who play for the team in possession also move across as well as the neutral.

If there is pressure on the end neutral, they have the option to play long and over the top to either the opposite neutrals or the players in the opposite area.

If the defending team manages to win possession the players in the middle zone and opposite possession area switch and the new team in possession aims to play across to keep possession.

Variations

  • Allow the neutrals on the ends to step forward if there is space to do so.
  • Limit touches
  • Only allow 1 time long passes

By Sean Pearson. Sean is also the author Coaching Team Shape in the 3-3-1, Coaching Team Shape in the 4-2-3-1 and Coaching Team Shape in the 4-3-3