Tag Archives for " Steve Smith "

Endless 4v4

By Steven Smith

Setup:
One grid is set up in the front third of the field using a full half field. The grid is set with the width of the 18 yard box making the width of the grid 44 yards.

Execution:
Four players come from the midfield stripe or a bit closer as shown in the diagram and attack a group of four defenders who are positioned deep in the field in a zonal defense shape.

If the attacking team is successful in getting a shot off either on goal, over the end line or to the keeper’s hands, the attacking group becomes the defending group and a new group of four come from the midfield stripe to attack the newly appointed defenders.

However, if the defending group is successful in cutting out the attacking group and gaining possession, the defensive group attempts to score on any of the three small goals at the opposite end. If they are successful in scoring on the small goals then the defensive group gets to stay on the field and defend again. If they are not successful in scoring they come off the field and the initial attackers become the defenders.

Variations:
Coach should have all waiting players with pinnies in their hands as the new attacking group entering should contrast in color with the defending group.

Coach can have the defending group stay on for 3-4 runs of attack prior to making any switches changing the game from an endless game to a predetermined number of attack before the switch.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.

Crossing Free Zones

By Steven Smith

Setup:
Two free zones are set up outside a 36 by 30-yard field. Zones are free from defenders. Grid size can be up to half field depending on age of players and functional desire of coach. The free zone sizes can also be adjusted.

Execution:
Flat back four defend groups of attackers who come from end line with the ball. They can attack in combination play up the center of the field or they can send the ball to the flank zone that is free of defenders. Ball is crossed quickly and attackers attempt to score. When ball is cleared a new group of attackers come at the same defenders. Attack in groups of 6 plus free zone attackers.

Variations:
Coach can limit the attacking group to four players plus the flank free zone players.

Coach can require all attack to come from flank with all attackers selling out to the crossed ball without any balance.

Coach can blow whistle and the ball must get to the flank within two touches.

Coach can allow counter attack opportunity for the defending group on opposite full size goal.

Coach can limit the number of attackers that can come into the box for the crossed ball.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.

Brazilian Triangle Series

By Steven Smith

Setup:
Three to four sets of the triangles are set up as shown in the first diagram. Three players are in each triangle and set up on the cone in each location. Distance between cones should be about five yards within the triangle and 15 yards between triangle sets.

Execution:
Players execute a series of predetermined passing sequences as shown in each diagram. Players should eventually become so adept at this warm up that it can be led by the players with the switching of the patterns being done by the leaders of your group. Spend approximately three minutes on each passing sequence before switching sides.

Variations:
1. Coach can set up competitions between the groups to see how many passes in a pattern can be accomplished in a set amount of time.

2. Coach can change up the size of the triangles in increasingly bigger distances and switch groups to each of the increasingly bigger spaces. The precision of passing touches can be translated to the larger spaces that may occur in the game.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.

Speed Dribble

By Steven Smith

Setup:
This activity is designed to encourage dribble penetration through the field when space is given. Teams who recognize space for speed dribbling will force defenses to make decisions based on the attacking team. It will be more likely that advances into more dangerous spaces on the field will occur.

Execution:
Two grids are set up in 25 yard squares approximately 20 yards apart. Two color groups are set up so that each grid has 5 vs. 3 occurring in each grid. Each grid plays keep away with the group of 5 retaining the ball. When the defense group of three gets the ball they attempt to retain as long as possible. On the coach’s whistle an attacking player from grid A speed dribbles to grid B and continues to play keep away in the new grid. A player from the sideline joins grid A and the same activity continues. On the same coach’s whistle that initiated the grid switch a player from grid B speed dribbles out of that grid and takes a shot on the goal and then joins the line for grid A.

Variations:
Keep both color groups the same for two separate timed games where score is kept for each successful goal scored after exiting the grid.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.

Double Goal

By Steven Smith

Setup:
This activity is designed to convert possession to shooting in a quick sequence. The teams must focus on proper and skillful possession of the ball in a tight space and then quickly convert that to a shooting opportunity and apply good finishing skills.

Execution:
Two grids are set up in 18 yard squares approximately 20 yards apart. Two color groups are set up so that each grid has 4 vs. 4 plus 1 in each grid. Each grid plays keep away with the extra color player in red always on the attacking team side (team in possession of ball at any given time). The coach predetermines the number of passes that must be completed consecutively and uninterrupted by anyone on the opposing team before the final player leaves the grid and takes a shot on goal. A player from the sideline joins each grid after a player leaves to shoot. The shooting player rejoins the sideline of the next grid over and the same activity continues.

Variations:
1. All players who take shots return to their same grid they left and score is kept between the two teams in that grid. Winners advance to play winners of the other grid.

2. Both teams shoot at the same time on opposite goals by the coach blowing a whistle during the possession. The team that scores first on each whistle gets the goal and the second shooter does not get a point even if he or she successfully scores their shot.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.

Session Specific Warm Up

By Steven Smith

Setup:
Warming up our players often happens separate from the actual skills of soccer and is viewed by many coaches as unrelated to the theme of training in the main series.

This activity emphasizes a gradual warm up using the skills that will be needed during the main series when working on passing and receiving and possession skills. The activities described should be intermittent with range of motion and active stretching when transitioning from one step to another in the described activities. All stretching should last at least one minute per stretch with any static stretching. Coaches must lead the stretch so that the duration of the stretch is not cut short. Each of the activities described can last around 3-4 minutes for a long gradual warm-up leading toward a main series workout.

All players should have vests at the start of this activity and split into two different color groups. For this activity they will be described as wearing yellow or black.

Execution:
Activity 1: Players are grouped into twos while passing and receiving with their designated partner in the grid space provided (for groups of 18 or more the grid should be quite large to encourage lots of movement covering all portions of the grid). Give instruction to keep the head up and avoid touching any other players.

STRETCH INTERVAL FOLLOWS

Activity 2: Play continues with one ball per two people but instead of a designated partner, the players with the ball must find any person in the grid and pass to the person who actively calls for the ball. Players must not pass the ball to anyone who does not actively show for the ball by communicating their desire for the ball through their voice, their posture or clear eye contact. Coach must emphasize those three methods of communication.

STRETCH INTERVAL FOLLOWS

Activity 3: Players continue play but yellow may only pass and receive with yellow and black may only pass and receive with black. This will force players to think ahead and pick out their “team” in the midst of the chaos of the ball movements and player movements.

STRETCH INTERVAL FOLLOWS

Activity 4: All players remove their vests and tuck them into their waist bands. Reduce the number of balls for passing and receiving and restart the activity with passing and receiving to anyone in the grid (same restriction on passing only after appropriate communication as earlier). As coach determines he/she instructs a player to put on his or her vest and that player then becomes a defender who seeks to intercept passes and knock the ball out of the grid. Balls knocked out of the grid can be retrieved by a player and then resume the passing and receiving. Coach adds the number of defenders based on preference and desire for pressure on the warm-up. Coach may also reduce the number of balls allowed for passing and receiving.

STRETCH INTERVAL FOLLOWS

Activity 5: Coach reduces the number of balls to three for passing and receiving. As the number of players builds up the defending players with vests on no longer attempt to knock the ball out of play but instead try to keep possession inside the grid. The other players attempt to win the ball back for their passing and receiving with non-vest wearing players. It basically becomes a game of keep away.

STRETCH INTERVAL FOLLOWS

Activity 6: Coach controls the numbers leading to even sided play with both teams attempting to maintain possession. The coach closely monitors play and challenges each team to attempt to possess all three balls at the same time. When one team possesses all three of the balls then play is stopped and the losing team makes a sprint to the end line and back. Then play is resumed with the same challenge until the coach calls conclusion of the warm-up.

By Steve Smith
Steve Smith has been a men’s college coach that holds an NSCAA Advanced National Diploma and a Doctorate in Physical Education.